Anushka Sharma Bulbbul Movie Review Strikes at the putrid core patriarchy

Anushka Sharma Bulbbul Movie Review Strikes at the putrid core of patriarchy

Anushka Sharma Bulbbul Movie Review Director Anvita Dutt mixes the feudal with the supernatural, the spooky, the mythological and therefore the fable-esque during a thoughtful, moving and interesting manner

Anushka Sharma Bulbbul Movie Review

Back in 1962, in Sahib Bibi Aur Ghulam, Abrar Alvi took us in to at least one of the various crumbling havelis of a decaying feudal Bengal. Mansions during which the desires of lonely women are throttled by unfaithful aristocratic husbands, where they strike undefined relationships with other men without quite having the ability to require them to a logical conclusion.

In her debut film, Bulbbul, which starts off in Bengal Presidency in 1881, Anvita Dutt does something similar but adds to the locale. She mixes the feudal with the supernatural and therefore the spooky, the mythological and therefore the fablesque to strike at the putrid core of patriarchy during a thoughtful, moving, engaging and powerful manner.

A word —vash (control) — and a picture , that of bichchue (toe rings), conveys it all about the lot of young girls. Bulbbul, a toddler bride, arrives within the Thakur family thinking life is all about fun and games with Satya, her devar (husband’s younger brother), who is her own age.

Anushka Sharma Bulbbul Movie Review Strikes at the putrid core of patriarchy

Not quite. Over time the rot within the haveli begins to reveal itself. It’s a world of twisted relationships, dysfunctional families and perversions. the ladies inside it — Bulbbul (Tripti Dimri) and Binodini (Paoli Dam) — are competitors, always during a game of 1 upmanship and insinuations, giving it back to every other with wordplay.

However, they also bond during a n indistinct but sinewy sisterhood in a space that denies them anything private. As Bulbbul’s husband Indranil (Rahul Bose) asks her rhetorically: “Ek patni ka uske pati ke alawa kya niji ho sakta (What are often personal for a wife aside from her husband)?” Sharm (shame), maryada (propreity), sahi (right), galat (wrong) — that’s all that seems to control a woman’s life.

Bulbbul doesn’t baulk from showing extreme violence and violation. A doll here, the talk about broken bones there, a regard to falling down the steps of the house —bit by bit the hints at the intrinsic oppression, and their repercussions, pile on and reach the height during a rousing, powerful monologue by Binodini about “badi haveli ke bade raaz

(the big secrets of the large mansion)” wherein women of the household could be showered with silk and jewellery, but told to remain silent about secrets. Dam packs during a punch as does Dimri within the lead. From the vulnerable and therefore the innocent to the transformation into the mysterious tease, Dimri may be a stunner who speaks volumes together with her eyes. and therefore the audience can do little but stay enraptured.